Cette initiative promeut donc une vision holistique et intégrée de « La santé » (c'est-à-dire sans isoler la santé humaine, de la santé animale et de celle de l'environnement, et en cherchant à mieux comprendre et utiliser les interactions complexes qui existent entre ces trois domaines). Elle encourage une collaboration transdisciplinaire ou multidisciplinaire (à co-égalité) et une communication interdisciplinaire entre les domaines vétérinaires et médicaux (en incluant les médecins ostéopathes, dentistes, la santé mentale, etc.) ainsi qu'avec d'autres scientifiques concernés par la santé, les soins et l’environnement (santé environnementale) et avec des éthologues, anthropologues, économistes, sociologues, etc.
The premise of body cleansing is based on the Ancient Egyptian and Greek idea of autointoxication, in which foods consumed or in the humoral theory of health that the four humours themselves can putrefy and produce toxins that harm the body. Biochemistry and microbiology appeared to support the theory in the 19th century, but by the early twentieth century, detoxification based approaches quickly fell out of favour.[6][7] Despite abandonment by mainstream medicine, the idea has persisted in the popular imagination and amongst alternative medicine practitioners.[8][9][10] In recent years, notions of body cleansing have undergone something of a resurgence, along with many other alternative medical approaches. Nonetheless, mainstream medicine continues to view the field as unscientific and anachronistic.[9]
“Le mouvement One Health (“une seule santé”), initié au début des années 2000, fait suite à la recrudescence et à l'émergence de maladies infectieuses, en raison notamment de la mondialisation des échanges. Le principe [de One Health] est simple : la protection de la santé de l'Homme passe par la santé de l'animal et celle de l'ensemble des écosystèmes”, peut-on lire sur le site de l'Inrae. Alors que nous traversons une période de pandémie mondiale, comme l'explique Philippe Mauguin, PDG de l'Inrae, il est important de rappeler que 60 % des maladies infectieuses humaines proviennent du monde animal : c'est la zoonose. De plus, 70 % de ces maladies nous sont transmises par les animaux sauvages. L'objectif de cet Institut qui a vu le jour en janvier 2020, au travers de One Health, est de démontrer le lien entre la dégradation de la biodiversité et l'émergence de ces nouvelles zoonoses. Pour cela, plusieurs départements et unités de recherche de l'Inrae consacrent leurs études aux facteurs de dégradation et des pressions imposées sur l'ensemble des écosystèmes. “La problématique des conséquences directes et indirectes de différents facteurs de l'environnement sur les santés [...] est un sujet de préoccupation pour l'Inrae”, explique Thierry Caquet, Directeur Scientifique-Environnement de l'Institut.
Body cleansing and detoxification have been referred to as an elaborate hoax used by con artists to cure nonexistent illnesses. Most doctors contend that the 'toxins' in question do not even exist.[16][17] In response, alternative medicine proponents frequently cite heavy metals or pesticides as the source of toxification, however no evidence exists that detoxification approaches have a measurable effect on these or any other chemical levels. Medical experts state that body cleansing is unnecessary as the human body is naturally capable of maintaining itself, with several organs dedicated to cleansing the blood and gut.[18]
Finally, while many testimonial and anecdotal accounts exist of health improvements following a "detox", these are more likely attributable to the placebo effect; where people actually believe that they are doing something good and healthy. Yet, there is a severe lack of quantitative data. Some changes recommended in certain "detox" lifestyles are also found in mainstream medical advice (such as consuming a diet high in fruits and vegetables). These changes can often produce beneficial effects in and of themselves, and it is accordingly difficult to separate these effects from those caused by the more controversial detoxification recommendations.
Finally, while many testimonial and anecdotal accounts exist of health improvements following a "detox", these are more likely attributable to the placebo effect; where people actually believe that they are doing something good and healthy. Yet, there is a severe lack of quantitative data. Some changes recommended in certain "detox" lifestyles are also found in mainstream medical advice (such as consuming a diet high in fruits and vegetables). These changes can often produce beneficial effects in and of themselves, and it is accordingly difficult to separate these effects from those caused by the more controversial detoxification recommendations.
Coffee, as you may already know, is a natural laxative and can be a potential diuretic. It can help remove waste, along with water and, of course, toxins, from your body. It defeats the purpose of trying to detox, however, if you add creamer and sugar. In addition, because the effects of coffee (consumed in considerable amounts) are unclear, you should limit how much you consume.
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